I talk a lot.

alexthehomo:

lesbianlustandlove:

beautiful.

woman.

alexthehomo:

lesbianlustandlove:

beautiful.

woman.

(Source: iamblaq)

thecarvingwitch:

It’s about 20 degrees cooler in this shade

thecarvingwitch:

It’s about 20 degrees cooler in this shade

(Source: katara)

largecoin:

what a day!!!!!!!! nothing happened and i was tired

thechamberofsecrets:

earlier today i was thinking about the thousands of girls who post videos on youtube reviewing makeup and talking about their fav products and making tutorials and how no girl has ever once done it just to impress men like literally that whole community exists just for girls because it’s something that so many of us enjoy and yet men still think that we wear makeup for them

blinkingrune:

lifehackable:

How to relationship.

i would 100% open all of them at once oops

art-of-swords:

The Mysterious Geometry of Swordsmanship, Gorgeously Illustrated
By Daniel Margocsy
Girard Thibault’s ‘Académie de l’Espée’ (1628) puts the art of wielding the sword on mathematical foundations. For Thibault, a Dutch fencing master from the early seventeenth century, geometrical rules determined each and every aspect of fencing.
For example, the length of your rapier’s blade should never exceed the distance between your feet and the navel, and your movements in a fight should always be along the lines of a circle whose diameter is equal to your height.
The rest of his manual, geared towards gentlemanly readers who took up fencing as a noble sport, is filled with similar geometrical arguments about the choreography of swordsmanship. Thibault’s work belongs to the same tradition that produced Leonardo’s renowned Vitruvian Man.
According to the laws of proportion, the ideal human body could be inscribed in a circle, and one could easily compute the length of the main body parts as simple fractions of the length of the body. 
[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Slate Group LLC.

art-of-swords:

The Mysterious Geometry of Swordsmanship, Gorgeously Illustrated

  • By Daniel Margocsy

Girard Thibault’s ‘Académie de l’Espée’ (1628) puts the art of wielding the sword on mathematical foundations. For Thibault, a Dutch fencing master from the early seventeenth century, geometrical rules determined each and every aspect of fencing.

For example, the length of your rapier’s blade should never exceed the distance between your feet and the navel, and your movements in a fight should always be along the lines of a circle whose diameter is equal to your height.

The rest of his manual, geared towards gentlemanly readers who took up fencing as a noble sport, is filled with similar geometrical arguments about the choreography of swordsmanship. Thibault’s work belongs to the same tradition that produced Leonardo’s renowned Vitruvian Man.

According to the laws of proportion, the ideal human body could be inscribed in a circle, and one could easily compute the length of the main body parts as simple fractions of the length of the body. 

[ CONTINUE READING… ]

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Slate Group LLC.

I believe in boys with sad eyes and soft smiles.
I believe in girls who roar back at the thunder
and still kiss like the first time they fell in love.
I believe in the people who’s skin never felt like home to them,
so they carved home out of the dust beneath their shoes
and kept on going.
I believe in all the ones who are told they don’t belong.
I don’t think I belong either.
I don’t know what it means to “belong”
but I know the ones shouting have nothing to offer,
that fitting in is the fad diet we’re all starving ourselves to.
I believe in us.
The ones who have never felt good enough.
I believe in the girl next door, who likes to be called “her”
but who woke up, today, with a gender that felt like
hand spun wool and spilled milk,
and who still doesn’t know how to tell her mother.
I believe in the ones dating the wrong people
so their parents won’t have to know
who it is they want to love.
I believe in a fear like that.
I believe in the kindness of strangers
and I believe that turning a blind eye
isn’t what makes you bad.
It only makes you scared like the rest of us.
I believe people learn to be brave.
I believe in the hands picking flowers as much
as I believe in the hands that plant them.
Because sometimes our hearts are too big for our bodies
and they like to go bumping against each other—
sometimes,
love doesn’t mean what you think it does.
You and I don’t love the same, but we are,
all of us, out here loving.
I believe in the collection of fingerprints you pick up
from everything in the world you have ever touched.
If I believe in anything,
I believe that that
is enough.

Faith, by Ashe Vernon (via latenightcornerstore)

wordsdancemag:

Here’s a peek at some of our current & planned titles in all their virtual glory!

Along with our paperbacks, all of the books in our book shop have digital editions! You can read them on your desktop computer, laptop or on most any mobile device, including Kindle!

I get the sentimentality that surrounds small press books & books in general, believe me– I used to painstakingly handcraft the zine + all of Words Dance’s books & I loved everything about doing it. Since going digital though, it’s opened up so many different doors in my artistry plus it’s given me the gift of more time & for that, I am beyond grateful.

Though I love building upon my tangible book collection (except when I find myself in the midst of moving!) I’ve become quite fond of my Kindle & the space it frees up! While I love holding books, the smell of books, touching & dog-earring the pages of books, I also love the instant gratification that the digital world allows & let’s not forget the trees that it saves! 

It doesn’t matter how you choose to feed your head & heart, by way of paper or screen, all that matters is that you do!

Be Moving & Be Moved,
Amanda